Latest: Judge: Gamers cannot play pending 'swatting' trialJune 13, 2018 9:25pm

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — The Latest on two gamers charged in fatal "swatting" call in Wichita (all times local):

4:00 p.m.

Two gamers whose online dispute over a video game allegedly led to a swatting call that resulted in police fatally shooting a Wichita, Kansas, man were prohibited from any online gaming while they are free on bond.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Kenneth Gale imposed that added restriction Wednesday at the request of prosecutors. The government did not seek their detention.

Eighteen-year-old Casey Viner, of North College Hill, Ohio, and 19-year-old Shane Gaskill, of Wichita, quietly answered not guilty at their arraignment on charges of conspiracy to obstruct justice, wire fraud and other counts. Gaskill showed up in court dressed in a black tie and shirt and Viner wore a black suit with a blue shirt and gray tie.

The two gamers will be living with their parents pending trial, and the judge also forbade them from keeping firearms in the household. He made an exception to the gun restriction for Viner's father, who is a law enforcement officer.

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2:30 p.m.

Two gamers whose online dispute over a video game allegedly led to a swatting call that resulted in police fatally shooting a Wichita, Kansas, man have pleaded not guilty.

Eighteen-year-old Casey Viner, of North College Hill, Ohio, and 19-year-old Shane Gaskill, of Wichita, pleaded not guilty Wednesday to conspiracy to obstruct justice, wire fraud and other counts.

Prosecutors allege Vinter asked 25-year-old Tyler Barriss of Los Angeles to "swat" Gaskill. Police went to a Wichita home in response to the call and shot Andrew Finch, who was not involved in the dispute.

Gaskill and Viner were released on a $10,000 bond.

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12:30 p.m.

Two online gamers will be making their first appearances in federal court for their alleged roles in hoax calls that led a Kansas police officer to fatally shoot an unarmed man in a case of "swatting" that drew national attention.

An indictment charges 18-year-old Casey Viner of North College Hill, Ohio, with conspiracy to make false reports after he allegedly became upset while playing Call of Duty: WWII online and asked 25-year-old Tyler Barriss of Los Angeles to "swat" 19-year-old Shane Gaskill in Wichita.

Viner and Gaskill face federal conspiracy, obstruction of justice and wire fraud charges.

Barriss is being prosecuted first in Sedgwick County District Court on related state charges of involuntary manslaughter, giving a false alarm and interference with a law enforcement officer.

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