APNewsBreak: Grandmother in travel ban flap arriving in USAugust 13, 2017 4:11am

HONOLULU (AP) — The Syrian grandmother at the center of Hawaii's lawsuit challenging President Donald Trump's travel ban on people from six mostly Muslim countries is expected to arrive in Honolulu Saturday.

Ismail Elshikh, the imam of a Honolulu mosque, said his 52-year-old mother-in-law Wafa Yahia received approval from the U.S. government several weeks ago. She is scheduled to arrive at Honolulu's Daniel K. Inouye International Airport Saturday evening on a flight from San Francisco in a 28-hour journey that started in Lebanon, he said.

Elshikh is a plaintiff in Hawaii's challenge to the travel ban. The lawsuit argues that the ban prevented his Syrian mother-in-law from visiting.

The complex legal wrangling over the travel ban is ongoing. A federal appeals court in Seattle is scheduled to hear arguments later this month in the government's appeal of a judge's ruling in July that allows grandmothers and other family members of those in the U.S. who may enter the country.

The U.S. Supreme Court previously allowed a scaled-back version of the ban to go into effect before it hears the case in October. The justices exempted visa applicants from the ban if they can prove a "bona fide" relationship with a U.S. citizen or entity.

"The news that Dr. Elshikh's family is being reunited is one bright moment today when love trumped hate," Hawaii Attorney General Doug Chin said in a statement. "In America, no race should ever be excluded, no religion should ever be hated, and no family ever gets left behind."

Yahia's immigrant visa approval would not affect Hawaii's lawsuit, Chin said: "So long as this discriminatory and illegal executive order is not struck down, the state of Hawaii and its residents are harmed."

Two of Elshikh's five children have never met her, he said. She last visited her family in Hawaii in 2005.

"Without the lawsuit, we couldn't get the visa. Without this challenge, my children would not have been reunited with their grandma," he said. "I still feel sadness for those who are still affected by the Muslim ban, who are not as lucky as my family."

Page 1 of 1

More Stories Like This

Business HighlightsBusiness Highlights
Neighbors: Former Trump campaign manager threatened themNeighbors of President Donald Trump's former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski say he harassed them in a land dispute and threatened to use his "political clout" to make their lives "a nightmare."
Former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, rides in on a horse named "Sassy" to vote a the Gallant Volunteer Fire Department, during the Alabama Senate race, Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, in Gallant, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
Ousted chief justice makes runoff in Alabama Senate race
FILE - In this Friday, Sept. 9, 2016, file photo, Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards testifies in on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the House Oversight and Government Reform subcommittee on Transportation and Public Assets hearing on FEMA's response to the flooding in Baton Rouge, La. Lawyers for Louisiana’s governor and attorney general are heading back to court to argue the constitutionality of an order aimed at protecting LGBT rights in state government. Edwards is hoping an appeals court will reinstate his executive order banning discrimination in government and state contracts based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Arguments are set for Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Molly Riley, File)
The Latest: Louisiana gov seeks to restore LGBT-rights order
California man gets 60 years for extorting businessesA man who extorted money from Riverside County businesses by threatening to sue them for violating the U.S. Americans with Disabilities Act has been sentenced to 20 years in jail
FILE - In this June 25, 2015, file photo, Muslim comedian Dean Obeidallah speaks at a news conference in New York. Obeidallah, a Muslim-American radio host, is accusing Andrew Anglin, the publisher of a notorious neo-Nazi website, of defaming him by falsely labeling him the “mastermind” of a deadly concert bombing in England, according to a federal lawsuit filed Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)
Neo-Nazi site's publisher says he's got no home on internet
This component is currently unavailable.
AdChoices

Related Searches

Related Searches

AdChoices