The Latest: San Francisco holds off on pot rulesNovember 15, 2017 12:15am

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The Latest on marijuana regulations in San Francisco (all times local):

4:05 p.m.

San Francisco cannabis lovers will have to wait a little longer for supervisors to establish regulations over where to allow new recreational marijuana stores in January.

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted to hold off on a temporary measure that would allow existing stores to sell recreational pot starting Jan. 1 and give the board more time to hash out rules.

The board needed to vote on the temporary cannabis measure Tuesday to be ready for sales on Jan. 1.

Supervisors in this pot-friendly city are having a difficult time agreeing to where to allow new recreational stores as critics, many of them older Chinese immigrants, have spoken up against marijuana use around children.

The board will take up cannabis regulations in two weeks after the Thanksgiving holiday.

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3:15 p.m.

A San Francisco supervisor is urging her colleagues to hold off voting on a stop-gap measure that would allow existing medical marijuana retailers to sell recreational weed starting Jan. 1.

San Francisco Supervisor Malia Cohen said Tuesday that the temporary measure would give a boost to existing retailers at a time when the city should be helping African Americans and other minorities who have been disproportionately hit by the war on drugs.

She said the Board of Supervisors should vote on a comprehensive program, including details for a robust equity program, instead of trying to meet a deadline. California voters approved a ballot measure in 2016 allowing recreational sale of marijuana starting Jan. 1.

Famously pro-cannabis San Francisco has had a surprisingly hard time determining where to allow new recreational stores as critics, many of them older Chinese immigrants, have spoken up against marijuana use around children.

10:10 a.m.

A California state senator says city supervisors are "dangerously close to destroying" the budding marijuana industry with their foot-dragging on approving regulations.

Famously pro-cannabis San Francisco has had a surprisingly hard time determining where to allow new recreational stores as critics, many of them older Chinese immigrants, have spoken up against marijuana use around children.

The Board of Supervisors is scheduled to take up the issue at its meeting Tuesday.

State Sen. Scott Wiener issued the joint statement with David Campos, chairman of the San Francisco Democratic Party. The former supervisors say a stop-gap compromise to allow existing medical marijuana outlets sell recreational pot starting Jan. 1 would create an unfair monopoly for those businesses.

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12:05 a.m.

Famously pro-cannabis San Francisco is having a surprisingly difficult time establishing regulations over where to allow new recreational stores come Jan. 1.

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors will take up legal cannabis regulations Tuesday.

It's been surprisingly difficult as critics, many of them older Chinese immigrants who oppose marijuana use, try to restrict where pot can be sold. They say children must be protected from the drug.

San Francisco supervisors have debated restricting retail cannabis shops to 600 feet (183 meters) from schools or 1,000 feet (305 meters) from schools. Cannabis advocates say the larger radius would kill the industry.

The board may vote on a holdover measure that would allow existing medical marijuana facilities to sell to adults Jan. 1, giving the board more time to hash out regulations.

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